Non-blocking IO | Tarantool
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Non-blocking IO

To test the REST API, we create a new script (client.lua), which is similar to our game.lua application, but makes HTTP POST and GET requests rather than calling Lua functions:

local http = require('curl').http()
local json = require('json')
local URI = os.getenv('SERVER_URI')
local fiber = require('fiber')

local player1 = {
    name="Player1",
    id=1,
    location = {
        x=1.0001,
        y=2.0003
    }
}
local player2 = {
    name="Player2",
    id=2,
    location = {
        x=30.123,
        y=40.456
    }
}

local pokemon = {
    name="Pikachu",
    chance=99.1,
    id=1,
    status="active",
    location = {
        x=1,
        y=2
    }
}

function request(method, body, id)
    local resp = http:request(
        method, URI, body
    )
    if id ~= nil then
        print(string.format('Player %d result: %s',
            id, resp.body))
    else
        print(resp.body)
    end
end

local players = {}
function catch(player)
    fiber.sleep(math.random(5))
    print('Catch pokemon by player ' .. tostring(player.id))
    request(
        'POST', '{"method": "catch",
        "params": [1, '..json.encode(player)..']}',
        tostring(player.id)
    )
    table.insert(players, player.id)
end

print('Create pokemon')
request('POST', '{"method": "add",
    "params": ['..json.encode(pokemon)..']}')
request('GET', '')

fiber.create(catch, player1)
fiber.create(catch, player2)

-- wait for players
while #players ~= 2 do
    fiber.sleep(0.001)
end

request('GET', '')
os.exit()

When you run this script, you’ll notice that both players have equal chances to make the first attempt at catching the pokémon. In a classical Lua script, a networked call blocks the script until it’s finished, so the first catch attempt can only be done by the player who entered the game first. In Tarantool, both players play concurrently, since all modules are integrated with Tarantool cooperative multitasking and use non-blocking I/O.

Indeed, when Player1 makes its first REST call, the script doesn’t block. The fiber running catch() function on behalf of Player1 issues a non-blocking call to the operating system and yields control to the next fiber, which happens to be the fiber of Player2. Player2’s fiber does the same. When the network response is received, Player1’s fiber is activated by Tarantool cooperative scheduler, and resumes its work. All Tarantool modules use non-blocking I/O and are integrated with Tarantool cooperative scheduler. For module developers, Tarantool provides an API.

For our HTTP test, we create a third container based on the official Tarantool 1.9 image (see client/Dockerfile) and set the container’s default command to tarantool client.lua.

../../../../_images/aster1.svg

To run this test locally, download our pokemon project from GitHub and say:

$ docker-compose build
$ docker-compose up

Docker Compose builds and runs all the three containers: pserver (Tarantool backend), phttp (nginx) and pclient (demo client). You can see log messages from all these containers in the console, pclient saying that it made an HTTP request to create a pokémon, made two catch requests, requested the map (empty since the pokémon is caught and temporarily inactive) and exited:

pclient_1  | Create pokemon
<...>
pclient_1  | {"result":true}
pclient_1  | {"map":[{"id":1,"status":"active","location":{"y":2,"x":1},"name":"Pikachu","chance":99.100000}]}
pclient_1  | Catch pokemon by player 2
pclient_1  | Catch pokemon by player 1
pclient_1  | Player 1 result: {"result":true}
pclient_1  | Player 2 result: {"result":false}
pclient_1  | {"map":[]}
pokemon_pclient_1 exited with code 0

Congratulations! Here’s the end point of our walk-through. As further reading, see more about installing and contributing a module.

See also reference on Tarantool modules and C API, and don’t miss our Lua cookbook recipes.

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